25 Books for Pride 2017

STPL is celebrating Pride Week! Come in and browse our Rainbow List display, or check out this staff-curated list of  25 Books for Pride 2017! There’s something for everyone!

Adult Books

 Long Red Hair by Meags Fitzgerald

In this graphic memoir, Fitzgerald paints a childhood full of sleepovers, playing dress-up, amateur fortune-telling and renting scary movies. The book navigates a child’s struggle with mediocrity, a preteen’s budding bisexuality and a young woman’s return after rejection.

All I Love and Know by Judith Frank

Told with the storytelling power and emotional fidelity of Wally Lamb, this is a searing drama of a modern American family on the brink of dissolution, one that explores adoption, gay marriage, and love lost and found. Are there limits to honesty or commitment—or love?

 The Gods of Tango by Carolina de Robertis

February 1913: seventeen-year-old Leda, clutching a suitcase and her father’s cherished violin, leaves her small Italian village for a new home (and husband) halfway across the world in Argentina. Upon her arrival in Buenos Aires, Leda is shocked to find that her bridegroom has been killed. She develops a passion for playing her violin that her father sent oversea with her. She even convinces an elderly Italian immigrant to teach her to play. Leda knows, however, that she can never play in public as a woman, so she cuts off her hair, binds her breasts, and, as a young man, joins a troupe of musicians bent on bringing tango into the salons of high society.

Queer City: Gay London from Romans to the Present Day by Peter Ackroyd

In Queer City, Ackroyd looks at the metropolis in a whole new way – through the history and experiences of its gay population. He takes us to the heart of this hidden city, celebrating its diversity, thrills and energy on the one hand, but reminding us of its very real terrors, dangers and risks on the other. In a city of superlatives, it is perhaps this endless sexual fluidity and resilience that encapsulate the real triumph of London.

How to Survive a Plague: the Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS by David France

Suspenseful, devastating, and finally inspiring, this is the story of the men and women who watched their friends and lovers fall, ignored by public officials, religious leaders, and the nation at large.  Expansive yet richly detailed, How to Survive a Plague is an insider’s account of a pivotal moment in the history of civil rights.

A Two Spirit Journey: the Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder by Ma-Nee Chacaby

From her early, often harrowing memories of life and abuse, Chacaby’s story is one of enduring obstacles. After finding support, she achieved sobriety and then trained and worked as an alcoholism counselor, raised her children and fostered many others, learned to live with visual impairment and came out as a lesbian. In 2013, Chacaby led the first gay pride parade in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Surpassing Certainty: What My Twenties Taught Me by Janet Mock

Riveting, rousing, and utterly real, Surpassing Certainty is a portrait of a young woman searching for her purpose and place in the world—without a road map to guide her. Despite her disadvantages, fueled by her dreams and inimitable drive, Janet makes her way through New York City while holding her truth close. She builds a career in the highly competitive world of magazine publishing—within the unique context of being trans, a woman, and a person of color.

Tomboy Survival Guide by Ivan Coyote

Ivan Coyote is a celebrated storyteller and the author of ten previous books, including Gender Failure (with Rae Spoon) and One in Every Crowd, a collection for LGBT youth. Tomboy Survival Guide is a funny and moving memoir told in stories, about how they learned to embrace their tomboy past while carving out a space for those of us who don’t fit neatly into boxes, identities or labels.

Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham by Emily Bingham

Raised like a princess in one of the most powerful families in the American South, Henrietta Bingham was offered the helm of a publishing empire. But her love affairs with women made her the subject of derision and caused a doctor to try to cure her queerness. For the biographer and historian Emily Bingham, the secret of who her great-aunt was, and just why her story was concealed for so long, led to Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham.

“You’re in the Wrong Bathroom!” And 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions about Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People by Laura Erickson-Schroth and Laura A. Jacobs

This book unpacks the twenty-one most common myths about transgender people. Authors Laura Erickson-Schroth, MD, a psychiatrist, and Laura A. Jacobs, LCSW-R, a psychotherapist, address myths about trans identity (all trans people are trapped in the wrong body ), sex and relationships (most trans people do sex work and have HIV), health and safety (trans people are mentally ill and therapy can change them), and history and community (trans people and feminists don t get along).”

When Your Child is Gay: What You Need to Know by Wesley C. Davidson and Jonathan L. Tobkes

Emphasizing communication and unconditional love, Davidson and Tobkes help parents untangle their own feelings, identify and overcome barriers to acceptance, encourage strong self-esteem in their child, handle negative or hostile reactions to their child’s sexual identity, and more. Filled with case studies and interviews, along with useful action plans and conversation starters, this is a positive, progressive guide to raising healthy, well-adjusted adults.

The Gender Creative Child: Pathways for Nurturing and Supporting Children Who Live Outside Gender Boxes by Diane Ehrensaft

In her groundbreaking first book, Gender Born, Gender Made, Dr. Diane Ehrensaft coined the term gender creative to describe children whose unique gender expression or sense of identity is not defined by a checkbox on their birth certificate. Now, with The Gender Creative Child, she returns to guide parents and professionals through the rapidly changing cultural, medical, and legal landscape of gender and identity.

Journey to Same-Sex Parenthood by Eric Rosswood

Journey to Same-Sex Parenthood provides a unique combination of inspirational firsthand accounts combined with the critical information, tips and advice needed to help couples successfully navigate the complex road to parenthood. Each section includes a description of the specific family-building approach, followed by personal stories from same-sex couples and individuals who have chosen and gone through that particular journey.

Children and Teen Books

Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard

All Pen wants is to be the kind of girl she’s always been. So why does everyone have a problem with it? “This is a fresh title in the growing sea of LGBTQ YA literature. There is no sugarcoating in this very real portrayal of an aspect of teen life that many experience. Recommended for fans of YA urban fiction as well as those who prefer grittier LGBTQ lit.” — School Library Journal

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime.

Georgia Peaches and other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Brown

Joanna Gordon has been out and proud for years, but when her popular radio evangelist father remarries and decides to move all three of them from Atlanta to the more conservative Rome, Georgia, he asks Jo to do the impossible: to lie low for the rest of her senior year. And Jo reluctantly agrees. Joanna meets the perfect girl for her and must decide whether to break a promise that could change everything for her and her family or lose out on love.

When the Moon was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore

To everyone who knows them, best friends Miel and Sam are as strange as they are inseparable. Roses grow out of Miel’s wrist, and rumors say that she spilled out of a water tower when she was five. Sam is known for the moons he paints and hangs in the trees and for how little anyone knows about his life before he and his mother moved to town. Atmospheric, dynamic, and packed with gorgeous prose, When the Moon was Ours is another winner from Anna-Marie McLemore.

Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy

Standing over six feet tall with unmistakable blue hair, Ramona is sure of three things: she likes girls, she’s fiercely devoted to her family, and she knows she’s destined for something bigger than the trailer she calls home in Eulogy, Mississippi. But juggling multiple jobs, her flaky mom, and her well-meaning but ineffectual dad forces her to be the adult of the family. Now, with her sister Hattie’s pregnancy, responsibility weighs more heavily than ever.

Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights by Ann Bausum

In 1969 being gay in the United States was a criminal offense. It meant living a closeted life or surviving on the fringes of society. People went to jail, lost jobs, and were disowned by their families for being gay. Most doctors considered homosexuality a mental illness. There were few safe havens. Ann Bausum’s riveting exploration of the Stonewall Riots and the national Gay Rights movement that followed is eye-opening, unflinching, and inspiring.

One Man Guy by Michael Barakiva

Alek Khederian should have guessed something was wrong when his parents took him to a restaurant. Everyone knows that Armenians never eat out.  Alek’s parents announce that he’ll be attending summer school in order to bring up his grades. Alek is sure this experience will be the perfect hellish end to his hellish freshmen year of high school. He never could’ve predicted that he’d meet someone like Ethan.

History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

When Griffin’s first love and ex-boyfriend, Theo, dies in a drowning accident, his universe implodes. Even though Theo had moved to California for college and started seeing Jackson, Griffin never doubted Theo would come back to him when the time was right. But now, the future he’s been imagining for himself has gone far off course. If Griffin is ever to rebuild his future, he must first confront his history.

The Other Boy by M.G. Hennessey

Twelve-year-old Shane Woods is just a regular boy. But Shane is keeping something private, and when a classmate threatens to reveal his secret, Shane’s whole world comes crashing down. It will take a lot of courage for Shane to ignore the hate and show the world that he’s still the same boy he was before. And in the end, those who stand beside him may surprise everyone, including Shane.

Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart

Lily Jo McGrother, born Timothy McGrother, is a girl. But being a girl is not so easy when you look like a boy. Especially when you’re in the eighth grade.  Dunkin Dorfman, birth name Norbert Dorfman, is dealing with bipolar disorder and has just moved from the New Jersey town he’s called home for the past thirteen years. One summer morning, Lily Jo McGrother meets Dunkin Dorfman, and their lives forever change.

My Mixed-Up Berry Blue Summer by Jennifer Gennari

Twelve-year-old June Farrell is sure of one thing—she’s great at making pies—and she plans to prove it by winning a blue ribbon in the Champlain Valley Fair pie competition. But a backlash against Vermont’s civil union law threatens her family’s security and their business. Even when faced with bullying, June won’t give up on winning the blue ribbon; more importantly, she won’t give up on her family.

Pride: Celebrating Diversity and Community by Robin Stevenson

Pride Day is a spectacular and colorful event. But there is a whole lot more to Pride than rainbow flags and amazing outfits. So what exactly are we celebrating on Pride Day? How did this event come to be? And what does Pride mean to the people who celebrate it?

Enjoy celebrating Pride Week! If you’d like a comprehensive list of all of our LBTQ+ materials, check out our Rainbow List online!

 

 

 

Indigenous Book Club Month

Did you know that June is Indigenous Book Club Month? Perhaps you’re participating with your book club, but even if you’re not in a book club it’s a good time to check out some Indigenous authors! Here are some picks from our collection:

A Series of Unfortunate Read Alikes

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Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events has received the Netflix treatment and it’s getting great reviews! Are you a fan of this whimsical series? If you’ve explored the books, the movie, and the current series, here are some similar titles you’ll likely enjoy:

templeton-twins

The Templeton Twins Have an Idea by Ellis Weiner

Twelve-year-old twins John and Abigail Templeton, and their ridiculous dog, are kidnapped by a devious adult set of twins who are after their father’s not-so-genius invention.

alcatraz-vs

Alcatraz vs. the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson

Alcatraz Smedry is gifted a bag of sand for his 13th birthday, a strange gift that puts Alcatraz in the path of evil librarians on a quest for world domination! Alcatraz must put a stop to the evil librarians’ bid for power, can he get back his bag of sand and stop them?

larklight

Larklight by Phillip Reeve

Art and Myrtle Mumby live with their father in Larklight, a house that travels through space! Join them as they begin a fantastic adventure after Larklight receives a rare visitor, Mr. Webster, and the siblings end up in a battle to save the Known Universe.

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The Mysterious Benedict Society

This book puts its characters, as well as its readers, through a series of brain-teasers to see if they are one of the enlightened kids of the world. The most creative and intelligent kids are chosen to complete a top secret mission at the Learning Institute for the Very Enlightened, where things are not as they seem!

For more read-alikes, check here!

If you’re looking for a movie or a TV series that has the same feel as A Series of Unfortunate Events, give this list a try! There are even some on the list that adults will enjoy. And remember:

“When trouble strikes, head to the library. You will either be able to solve the problem, or simply have something to read as the world crashes down around you.”

-Lemony Snicket

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Reason #58: You Can Borrow Everything for Free!

Reason #58 - Everything is free

In this age of consumerism we have stores the size of football fields, online retailers that sell everything from books to groceries, and ads that are depressingly targeted to your web-browsing history. It seems like everyone is vying for your money and attention, no wonder we feel the need to buy so much stuff. The library is one of the last public spaces where you won’t be bombarded by advertisements, and your money is of no consequence to your borrowing privileges.

Here at the library you can go home loaded with items, and you won’t have to spend a dime. Books, audiobooks, DVDs, Blu-Rays, magazines, CDs, videogames and even e-readers. Come in and browse, maybe you’ll get that retail therapy buzz without having to part with any money! And remember that you’re welcome no matter your income level. You don’t need to wear your brand-name clothing or designer sunglasses, just come as you are.

 

Reason #46: Go Further with NoveList Plus!

Reason #46: Go further with NoveList Plus!

  • Looking for a good book?
  • Do you enjoy Science Fiction, but don’t know what to read next?
  • Do you like Alexander McCall Smith’s books, and want to find similar reads by different authors?
  • Do you want to learn more about a certain series?

 

If so, then NoveList Plus is just what you need!

 

St. Thomas Public Library has a subscription to the online database NoveList Plus – an amazing reader’s advisory database where you can learn about titles, series, authors, and genres, find read-alikes, book reviews and recommendations, discover Award-winners and book lists, check out discussion guides, and much, much more!

You can search among hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and readable nonfiction titles – NoveList has a staff of book experts, including over 25 librarians, who write all the recommendations! You know that you can trust a review from NoveList, and since it’s so easy to use, you’ll be finding new favorite books in no time at all!

The main page is easy to navigate. There is a simple search box on the top, where you can do a search by Keyword, Title, Author, Series, or Narrator.

Along the left-hand side, there are categories you can browse in, including: Audiobooks, Best of 2013, Canadian Fiction, Fantasy, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, Horror, Mysteries, Romance, etc. Once you select a category, you can explore some of the titles and authors.

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As an example, I clicked the category “Mystery” and selected “Cozy Crime”.

Here we see a short description of what a “Cozy Mystery” is, as well as some books from that genre. One feature that could be helpful is that you can see the “popularity” of each book.

NoveList 2

To continue our example, I’ve selected the book “As the Pig Turns”. On this page, you get all kinds of information about the book, including: when it was published, if it’s in a series, a brief description, the pace, the genre, the tone, the writing style, as well as both NoveList reviews and Goodreads reviews. On top of all that, on the right-hand side of the page, we see recommended read- alikes.

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Now I want to learn more about the author, M.C. Beaton. So I will click on her name (it is hyperlinked).

We now see a page with all kinds of information about the author, the different books and series she has written, her writing style, etc. A really handy tool appears on the right-hand side of the page: a list of author read-alikes.

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As you can see, this is a very powerful database with tons of information! So the next time you have a reader’s advisory question, the first place to start your search should be NoveList Plus!

Give it a try, and let us know how you like it!

Reason #40: Can’t Find It? We’ll Borrow It!

Reason #40 - ILLOs - We'll borrow it

Did you know that libraries borrow from other libraries? If you’re looking for something that we don’t have, make a request at the information desk and we can search other libraries for it! We do it all the time, especially for rare or older books that may be difficult to purchase.

When we order from another library for you (this is called an inter-library loan, or ‘ILLO’ as we say), the item will come to us on the SOLS (Southern Ontario Library Service) van that travels around to all libraries in Southern Ontario, or by post if the item is coming from a library outside of Southern Ontario. Your inter-library loaned item may come from as close as London, or as far away as Thunder Bay, but you get to pick it up right here at your own library! Borrowing times for inter-library loans vary depending on the lending library, but you normally get to keep the item for three weeks, just like any books you borrow from us. So ask us for that book you’ve been trying forever to track down; we just might be able to connect you with it!

A lot of local book clubs order their books through us, but that’s a whole different reason to celebrate the library. You’ll have to wait for the details!

On a similar note: St. Thomas Public Library is a “lending” library, which means we do the same thing for other libraries. People request books from us, and we ship them around the province (if not further.) In 2013, St. Thomas Public Library LENT 1,415 items and we BORROWED 1,404 items. So far this year (from January to May 2014,) we’ve LENT 1,274 items and we’ve borrowed 1,128 items. Looks like we’re on a role!

Reason #37: We’re Open 24/7 With Downloadable eBooks.

Reason #37 - Available 24-7 with eBooks

Do you have an eReader? A tablet? Cell phone? Mp3 player? Laptop or desktop computer? Then you might be interested to know that many of these devices, from the smallest mp3 player to the most powerful laptop computer, can be used to borrow electronic books and audiobooks directly from the St. Thomas Public Library. You can borrow up to 10 electronic items at a time, for periods between 14 and 21 days. If there is an eBook or eAudiobook that you want but it is out on loan, you can place a hold on it, just like at the library, and you will be emailed when it becomes available. With only a valid library card and PIN number you can access thousands of new titles and classics!

In order to provide you with eBooks and eAudiobooks, the St. Thomas Public Library relies on a third-party vendor, OverDrive, to manage our electronic collection. Using OverDrive’s resources and technology, the library is able to purchase materials and loan them out, just as we would with traditional printed books or audiobooks on CD, which all takes place at Ontario Library Service Download Centre. Just find St. Thomas Public Library and sign in using your library card number and your Personal Identification Number (PIN). If you don’t know your PIN number, just give us a call or drop-by and we’ll tell you what it is (your library card automatically has one assigned to it). Once you have signed into your account, you can place holds, check-out titles, and even create lists of titles you want to check-out in the future.

The eBooks and eAudiobooks that you can borrow from the Ontario Library Service Download Centre come in a variety of different formats and lending rights. Before borrowing an eBook or eAudiobook, it is important to check that the item you will be downloading is in a compatible format for your particular device. Come in and pick up a copy of our free how-to booklet for a little extra guidance, or visit OverDrive’s handy help page if you get confused.

That’s all you need to pack your device full of free eBooks or eAudiobooks! If you finish your book at 3 am and the library is closed, just sign into OverDrive and download something new to read. You’ll never have to get caught without a book again!